What is it?

The practice of actively maintaining dictionaries and glossaries focusing on globally accepted technical standards. Technical terms are organized and controlled, with a clear set of guidelines dictating their use.

Why is it important?

Terminology management enables correct and consistent use of terms throughout the writing process or any other effort requiring accurate vocabulary usage.

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What is it?

Specifications for eLearning training materials, including file formats, hardware and software requirements, query and statement structures, and protocols for tagging, citing, and attributing material. Examples of eLearning and mLearning standards include the former AICC (Aviation Industry CBT Committee), the current SCORM (Shareable Content Object Reference Model), and the emerging xAPI (the Experience Application Programming Interface).

Why is it important?

By conforming to standards, eLearning content can be created and packaged so as to be shareable across various learning management systems. Standards make eLearning material more available and discoverable, make launch and access more reliable, make tracking and data capture more flexible, and ensure that content is accessible to those with physical or mental challenges

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What is it?

Any application that processes XML documents so they can be used by that program or be prepared for use by another program.

Why is it important?

XML is a structured text format. To use XML in technical communication, you need an XML processor for functions such as editing, transforming XML into deliverables, and managing XML in a database.

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What is it?

Industry-defined file formats for images, video, audio, and other multi-sensory content that can be included as a resource in a structured XML document.

Why is it important?

Media standards provide a consistent technical method for delivering these experiences to a variety of output formats from single-source content (XML). The prominent documentation standards have dedicated elements for referencing media: DocBook has <inlinemediaobject> and <mediaobject> elements; DITA has <image> and <object>; TEI has the <media> element.

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What is it?

Vocabularies and processes used to create specialized, editable structures for documents that conform to the XML standard.

Why is it important?

Successful interchange of structured information depends on a common understanding of the vocabularies involved and how they are processed. The standards for providing this take the form of an XML schema and provide common ways of structuring different types of content to facilitate reuse, catalog maintenance, version control, and other aspects of technical documents.

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What is it?

A marketing approach which endeavors to provide customers with a seamless user experience, no matter through which channel or device, or during which stage of the content, product, or customer lifecycle.

Why is it important?

Successful omnichannel marketing depends on delivering the content appropriate to their stage in the lifecycle through the most appropriate channels.

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What is it?

Designing information to evoke, guide, sustain, and leverage human action.

Why is it important?

Minimalist information design is important because, in contexts of engaged activity, people neither want, nor can effectively use, comprehensive information.

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What is it?

The assembly of content after receiving a request, so the system can filter or merge different sources, process the results, and return content that is relevant to you at the moment you make the request.

Why is it important?

Given cloud and virtual technology, software systems are increasingly dynamic. The reader is also increasingly dynamic, whether using different devices or filling different roles. Static delivery simply can’t keep pace. Dynamic delivery captures the current states of system and reader and returns content that is specific and meaningful.

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What is it?

Variables that contain phrase-level content that needs to be in a topic no matter what document the topic is part of, but that changes depending on context, for example, a product name or a company name.

Why is it important?

Content variables have been a key factor in allowing reuse of content across products and platforms. By isolating terms or phrases that are likely both to appear in multiple places and to change depending on factors external to the content itself, those terms or phrases can be modified for publication without modifying the actual topic content.

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What is it?

Content that has sufficient metadata to allow a processor to filter or flag that content in any output format, using a profile to determine the exact output for a given context or format.

Why is it important?

Conditional content facilitates the reuse of content components in multiple contexts or formats. The metadata specifies the contexts to which a specific component applies.

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